Sponsored links


Valid XHTML 1.0!
Valid CSS!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: A Programmer's Guide to Java (tm) Certification
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Khalid A. Mughal, Rolf W. Rasmussen
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
This book got it all.


What an excellent book. So far three book available in the market for Java programmer certification. But this is really cool. At the end of each chapter, the questions are very tricky and, it gives you good concepts of each topic covered. Compared to other exam preparation book, this book gives you in-depth knowledge for each concept in Java. This book not only prepares and focuses you for the exam but also helps you to learn details of Java.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Beginning Visual C++ 6
Publisher: Wrox
Authors: Ivor Horton
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
So Microsoft Succeeded in Building an MPI between Objects?


If you read this book and know some Elementery staff about Parallel programming then you will notice that Microsoft might have succeeded in making a Message Passing Interface for Windows not between processors but between abstract object models. Ivor Horton takes you by the hand and explains in good detail the philosophy of MFC but he always keeps himself on the ground providing useful examples that make you learn. Everything in the book is needed to make the transition from ANSI C++ -----> Windows - OOP using C++ code instructions. But all of this is ok but listen to a song that I will whisper to my students when I have some:
"Don't be angry because I teach C++ in Ansi,
I am sure it is worse than looking to your cute girlfriend Nansi,
But be patient and enjoy the ride,
I am sure you will certainly at the end appreciate this waste of time"
A cute inliner code taken from this book:
void Swap(int& a, int& b) { a ^= b; b ^= a; a ^= b; }//Be carefull only swap integer values with this code!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Extreme Programming Installed
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Ron Jeffries, Ann Anderson, Chet Hendrickson, Ronald E. Jeffries
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Solid book with great XP coverage


XP is a nice fresh way of looking at the software development process and this book explains XP concisely and clearly. You may or may not agree to -all- of the principles they advocate, but if you have any interest in your work at all, you will find parts of this gripping. Especially the emphasis on unit tests and the test-first programming idea. And so useful in practice too! Anyone involved with making software, or indeed anyone else who is interested in increasing the quality of what you're working on whatever it is, should read this! So better borrow it from your neighbour (reading once is sufficient, no need to own this book).



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Enterprise JavaBeans, Fourth Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Richard Monson-Haefel, Bill Burke, Sacha Labourey
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Excellent!


I started out knowing very little about EJB's when I picked up this book. I'm happy to say I wasn't disappointed!The first three chapters give a 10,000 foot view about the role of EJB's in J2EE. Bean lifecycles are covered, container interaction, deploytment processes, etc. is all covered in a general and friendly manner. A little bit of code is presented to illustrate key points and help you start thinking about how to write code.The chapters following really drill down into the guts of entity, session (state and stateless), and message driven EJBs. Simple code examples are presented and taken apart, with detailed explanation about why certain things are the way they are, and how things work. Outstanding theory here! You get down into the nitty gritty about deployment descriptors, state diagrams, the works.There are also nice reference Appendices providing state transition diagrams, API references, etc.What impressed me most about this book is the author's careful distinction between EJB 1.1 and EJB2.0 specifications, including code samples of each, and the raw level of detail about how beans work.The bad part about this book is it assumes you know a lot of other fundamental technologies such as XML, JNDI, and JMS. I highly recommend you have references available on these technologies during reading if you're trying to learn the big picture at the same time. People who are really into code examples and not theory may also be a little disappointed by the simplicity of the examples given.All in all a great buy!