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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Photoshop 7 Down & Dirty Tricks
Publisher: New Riders Press
Authors: Scott Kelby
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
A PHOTOSHOP CLASSIC


IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN BECOMING A PHOTOSHOP ARTIST , THIS BOOK IS YOUR CHOICE , 80% OF THE TIPS WORK GREAT , THE EXPLAINING OF STEPS IS EASY , BUT SOME TIPS NEED TO BE EXPLAINED IN MORE DETAIL , NEVER THE LESS , A REALY GOOD BOOK TO BUY , ONE MORE THING , THE GRAPHICS ARE COOL .



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Maya Character Animation, 2nd Edition
Publisher: Sybex Inc
Authors: Jae-Jin Choi, Sybex
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Full of Must Know Techniques


Though this book is quite thick it doesnt have a lot of jargon. It is easy to go through and everything it tells you is of use. Its a very good choice for anyone who is interested in the 3D animation field.




Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Joe Celko's SQL for Smarties: Advanced SQL Programming
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann
Authors: Joe Celko
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
If you know some SQL and want to learn more, this is it!


This book is not his basic volume in SQL, but his advanced volume. It helps you along explaining different issues with an excellent explanation of NULLS, their pros and their cons. It gives examples of solving problems in different SQL ways. A great buy.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: The Code Book: The Science of Secrecy from Ancient Egypt to Quantum Cryptography
Publisher: Anchor
Authors: SIMON SINGH
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Mathematical knowledge can be critical for survival


Cryptography does not involve large numbers of men hacking each other to pieces with swords and spears or blowing each other to bits with powder and shot. Furthermore, the most significant achievements in cryptography are often covered in layers of government secrecy that take decades to be removed. Therefore, very few know how great a role it has played in the resolution of armed conflict. Singh lays out the history of cryptography, explaining the basics of the various codes while listing where they were used. Without question, the expertise of small numbers of code breakers has dramatically altered the course of history. The famous Zimmerman note from a German diplomat to the leadership of Mexico during World War I offered German support for Mexico reclaiming the American southwest if Mexico would declare war on the United States. The anger that it engendered in the U. S. swept away the last isolationist sentiment and precipitated U. S. entry into World War I. It was encrypted before being sent, but the code was cracked by the British, who then made the contents public. The incredible expertise of the British code breakers in cracking German codes in World War II may have been the difference in keeping Britain fighting during those dark days when she stood essentially alone against the mighty German military. In fact, many technical historians argue that the person most responsible for Britain surviving the German onslaught was not Winston Churchill, but the chief code breaker, Alan Turing. Turing's group was able to break the German military codes, thought to be unbreakable by the Germans, and the British were then able to concentrate their forces where the threats were greatest. So accurate was the British intelligence that one of their greatest problems was deciding when not to use it so that the Germans would not learn that they were reading the messages. In one of the most interesting stories in the book, Ian Fleming, the creator of the fictional super-spy James Bond, devised a scheme whereby the British would crash a German plane near a German ship. The British crew of the plane would then bail out and capture the German ship, capturing all the code books. The plan was ultimately scrapped, to the disappointment of Turing and his group. The cast of characters who have been significant in the advancement of cryptography contains some very unusual people. This is best summed up by the comment Winston Churchill made to the head of the Secret Intelligence Service when he visited the code breakers at Bletchley, "I told you to leave no stone unturned, but I didn't expect you to take me so literally." Some of the pictures in the book also reinforce this view. Nevertheless, they were brilliant people, and you learn how they were able to literally conquer incredible odds. Most started with situations where the number of possibilities was astronomical, and yet with ingenuity, persistence, luck and occasionally dirt tricks, they were able to reduce the numbers down to a level where it was possible to find a solution. This is a superb popular history of cryptography, written at a level that everyone can understand and shows a history of human conflict that is often deeply hidden from view. It also demonstrates how critical mathematical knowledge can be in the life of a nation.
Published in the recreational mathematics e-mail newsletter, reprinted with permission.