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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Professional C++ (Programmer to Programmer)
Publisher: Wrox
Authors: Nicholas A. Solter, Scott J. Kleper
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Good. I recommend this book for students


I recommend this book with "Hackish C++ Pranks&Tricks. You must read it all.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Programming .NET Components
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Juval Lowy
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Excellent book on .NET development, one of the best


When I was reading the first three chapters of this book I could have sworn that it was miss-titled; it should have been called Component Oriented Programming in .NET. Just so we get this straight, this is not a book about the wonderful components in the .NET Framework that Microsoft has provided -- this is a book about CREATING components in the .NET Framework.
The next item that needs to be clarified: What is a component? If you are from the Delphi/VCL world, a component is a non-visual object that can be manipulated in design-time with the mouse and the property browser, while usually being dragged onto a form (TTimer, TDatabase, TSession, TTable, etc). But in this book a component is a class -- the simpler the class, the better. No inheritance unless absolutely necessary, no class hierarchies, but interfaces are cool.
Now, once you get beyond the philosophy lessons of the first three chapters, you are left with one outstanding book on practical .NET development. The chapter on Events is worth the price of admission alone. The chapter on Versioning is excellent as well, but the rest of the sections are every bit as good.
Many of the topics covered in the book are not things you will find in the help files, or if they are, they are too scattered to be useful. What is covered: a large number of best practices, defensive coding techniques (again the chapter on Events is gold), and general you-really-need-to-know-this topics.
One note, some of the topics covered are very large (Remoting and Security are two examples), and if you are interested in those topics, there are other books that deal with them individually.
Summary: if you are into creating top-quality .NET software you should own this book.



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: A+ Certification All-in-One Exam Guide, 4th Edition
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Osborne Media
Authors: Michael Meyers
Rating: 1/5
Customer opinion - 1 stars out of 5
Couldn't Pass Exam with this book


This is a great book for learning the technical trade. Unfortunately, I failed both of the exams studing this book. It has very little updated informtaion regarding the new Comptia A+ Adapive Certification Exams.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Programming Perl (3rd Edition)
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Larry Wall, Tom Christiansen, Jon Orwant
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
a computer language book with humor, what else can I say ?


true, this book is not for everyone, if this is your first exposure to Perl go for another book, like Learning Perl, the so called Llama book, or if you're interested on programming server side web applications then almost any of the 100+ titles on web programming with perl/CGI will be fine. If you're just interested on getting your hands dirty righ away with Perl for writing a CGI script, then don't buy this book now or you we'll be complainig loudly like others have done here about how bad this book is, it's bad for their taste, that is.You can even find some humorous paragraphs, geek humor if you want, but anyway how many programming books can you find like this one ?Almost everything about Perl can be found on this book and you have a reference on the last pages about every Perl function, much more practical for me than online references.I have used Perl successfully for programming general purpose scripts, network monitoring applications, XML processing backends and the all ever popular de rigeur CGI scripts, all with the knowledge gained for this book.So if you want to use perl for more than CGI, please make room in your bookshelf ...