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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
Publisher: New Riders Press
Authors: Steve Krug
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Must read for web authors!


Steve Krug communicates his savvy approach to web design and navigation clearly and succinctly using great examples. He sets up best practice maxims which are pretty much indisputable and there's a great script at the end for one-on-one web-testing.Easy on technical mumbo-jumbo, big on strategy for making your site accessible and easy to navigate - if the user has to try and guess navigational options, Steve would say you're not doing very well as a designer. Read it!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Java Swing, Second Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: James Elliott, Marc Loy, David Wood, Brian Cole
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Good reference and guide to Swing


Pavel Vorobiev and I are currently finishing up an 'advanced' Swing book consisting mainly of examples ("Swing", Manning publications). We have referenced the Swing source code nonstop. Apart from this, we feel that Java Swing is the best Swing reference money can buy. This book is not an API docs dump. It is a high quality reference book for GUI developers who are prepared to do their job professionaly, not blindly. If you are looking for a hand-holding tutorial this book is not for you (for this I would suggest Up to Speed With Swing).
Java Swing is very well organized and full of original explanation. I encourage potential readers to disregard other comments claiming that this book is API repetitive or doesn't explain enough. No book can cover every possible situation that can arise in the creation of a GUI, and no book will fully explain all of the inner workings of each Swing component and UI delegate. Swing is a very complex and extensive library with some very interesting and powerful mechanisms working behind the scenes. Without a doubt, Java Swing is the most informative and rich reference available. I recommend it highly.
Matthew Robinson "Swing", Manning publications Swing "Tips and Tricks", The Swing Connection



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Microsoft Windows XP Inside Out, Second Edition (Inside Out)
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Authors: Ed Bott, Carl Siechert, Craig Stinson
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Everything you need to know


If you want a help book on Windows XP that does not waste 2 or 3 chapters with basic stuff that you have known since you played with your atari 2600, then Buy This Book, it deals with Intermediate/Advanced stuff without much wasted space....
I haven't had a chance to read the whole thing but I have tweaked my system with alot of advice and how to's from this book.....
If you are a former windows 2000 user, you may not be as excited as I am because I went from using the awful WinMe to XP, (hey! that rhymes)....anyway I don't regret anything about this book based on a quick look and read of a few chapters......
I hope this helps you with any decesions ......(...)



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: JavaScript: The Definitive Guide
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: David Flanagan
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Simply the Best


This is one of the best programming books I have ever read. The author's style is very readable and he mixes in the appropriate amount of code samples to illustrate the concepts. All code samples are very well documented, which is a big help.
This is really two books in one. First is a thorough explanation of the JavaScript language fundamentals and how to use JavaScript in web pages. Then, comes the very complete reference sections which describe all classes and functions of core JavaScript, client-side JavaScript, and DOM programming. As a result, this is the only book you need to both learn and use JavaScript.
The author also does a nice job of pointing out which functionality will or will not work on Netscape or IE. And, he includes useful tips on how to work around some of these issues.
Those with experience in HTML but no programming languages may have a hard time with the level of detail in this book, but experienced programmers will appreciate the serious treatment of the JavaScript language. Beginners who just want to learn how to do simple scripts may want to look elsewhere, but for the serious web programmer, this book is a must have.