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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: The Brand Gap: How to Bridge the Distance Between Business Strategy and Design
Publisher: New Riders Press
Authors: Marty Neumeier
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Brilliant Book


I just read "The Brand Gap" and thought it a brilliant book. Marty, thanks again for sharing your thoughtful insight and elegant brevity. Straight, focused and contempory views on the theory of branding. I've already sent copies to my several of my colleague and clients.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Beginning JavaScript Second Edition
Publisher: Wrox
Authors: Paul Wilton
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Click On The Shopping Cart!


Honestly, if you have no programming background, and you want to pick up Javascript to make your website interactive, this is THE BOOK! This is a gentle and clear introduction to programming and Javascript.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: C++ Pointers and Dynamic Memory Management
Publisher: Wiley
Authors: Michael C. Daconta
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
The best book on pointers I have seen


After reading the reviews, I purchased this book only to be severely disappointed. This book does a poor job explaining casting, pointer to pointers and scaling. The author included a lot of code in the text (and on disk), but very few comments within the code or text. In source 5.6, he has a 1 sentence explanations for 6 pages of code. I read the first 100 pages and that's all I can take. This book stinks!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: The Pragmatic Programmer: From Journeyman to Master
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Andrew Hunt, David Thomas
Rating: 1/5
Customer opinion - 1 stars out of 5
Highly overrated


This book includes a lot of obvious advice (like keep your designs simple --- the KISS principle), and is lacking in any profound insights about how to make it so. The material on Design by Contract elevates a marginally useful idea to a major breakthrough, which it is not. One wonders whether the authors have much field experience writing large systems.