Sponsored links


Valid XHTML 1.0!
Valid CSS!



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: Design Patterns
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, John Vlissides
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
A classic but wish to see updates


This book is a must-read for those who do software. It's a frequent (implicit and explicit) reference when you read Object Oriented Programming materials. So unless you read this book, you can better easily others. But I wish to see an update on this book authored using modern programming paradigms, e.g. Java programming. (E.g. Java doesn't have templates.)



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Spring in Action (In Action series)
Publisher: Manning Publications
Authors: Craig Walls, Ryan Breidenbach
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Simple, Concise, Comprehensive


Most technical books (esp java ones) fall into one of these categories:
-too simple
-technical concepts explained with equally if not more complex terminology
-too verbose, lot of trees cut

This book is very well thought of and starts with core spring concepts like BeanFactory, IoC & ApplicationContext. The author explains these concepts succinctly. Each chapter starts with a clear explanation of the core concept followed by simple but relevant examples, plus a bit of humor here and there ain't bad. I thought of Spring as mainly a web framework but after reading this I am very tempted to use it in non-web apps.

I think this may very well be the best J2EE book written ever.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Object-Oriented Software Construction (Book/CD-ROM) (2nd Edition)
Publisher: Prentice Hall PTR
Authors: Bertrand Meyer
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
1250 pages of theory and practical implementation


A complete book about object orientation for the first time user and the advanced programmer? When looking at the contents list it almost looks like that. Unfortunately the writer could not explain every detail on his 1250 pages. The first two parts about the meaning of object orientation and how to describe the models using this methodology are clear. The third part (referred to by the writer as the 'technical core') focuses in my opinion too much on the semi-code and less on the how and why. But the saddest is the fourth part. In only three pages is explained how to find classes, techniques for inheritance and interfaces.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: MDA Explained: The Model Driven Architecture--Practice and Promise
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Anneke Kleppe, Jos Warmer, Wim Bast
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Excellent gentle introduction to MDA


After having read this book back to back i'm left with both an eagerness to to know more about MDA and a sensation to try what is already there. The subtitle of the book really is a giveaway of its content: "Practice and promise". Practice in that it clearly describes where we stand as of now. Promise in that it gives you a feeling of what is yet to come. Maybe the best news is that it does this in slightly over 150 pages.The combination of the two gives the reader the opportunity to actually compare the merits of the tools claiming support for MDA, what kinds of transformations they support, how much and how these can be influenced, what kinds of PSM's they support and how well they support round-trip engineering. It even goes so far to indicate what never to expect from tooling.On the promise side, it walks you through the many OMG standards, readily explaining the gist of them and more importantly their interconnections. I wouldn't be surprised to find myself browsing through OMG standards in the near future, just to get a firmer grasp of the full bearing of their views on the nearby future of application development. As an example of how the book may affect you: I felt rather disappointed having read through about three quarters of the book. As I realized this was not because of the book, but by the current state of affairs. I got made clear that though MDA may be a great step forward, in standardizing a thing which has been subject of research for so many years, there is still so much left to be done.All in all not bad for a book which can easily be read in one undisturbed evening. (It actually took me two, but then again I've been doing some home improvement inbetween).