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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Beginning ASP Databases
Publisher: Wrox Press
Authors: John Kauffman, Kevin Spencer, Thearon Willis, John Kauffman
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
ASP made easy


If you want to write basic ASP scripts that make basic database calls, this is the book for you. I read this book to develop a system for teachers that allows them to write homework assignments to a database for my school (I'm 16). I have had a fair amount of Java Script and C++ programming before, but I did not know Visual Basic (the language in which these ASP scripts are written). All the programming is very intuitive. The authors also go to great lengths to catch the pitfalls you WILL run into, so pay attention to those seemingly careless mistakes because you will most definitely fall victim to them as well. My only gripe with this book was its sub-par index. If I were to look up SELECT statements, the index would not point me to where they are first introduced nor where the most information about the Clause was. However, this is only a mild hindrance.
Get it, Read it! -Kerry Creeron



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Core Servlets and JavaServer Pages, Vol. 1: Core Technologies, Second Edition
Publisher: Prentice Hall PTR
Authors: Marty Hall, Larry Brown
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Great Reference


I was hunting all over the net for a book which could clearly explain in the best possible ways the concepts of Servlets/JSP's. Many articles were available but not very convincing ones. But this book by Marty Hall is really worthy of all praises. It was just the kind of book I was looking for. It explains the concepts in a very smooth way covering the required basics and taking the reader to advanced topic level. I could never have asked for a better book than this. It was like a "Stop here, Look no further" for information of Servlets/JSP. This is no doubt a "Must buy" at any given time. I look forward to more books like this and wish Marty Hall all success for his endeavours of writing future books.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Thinking in Java (3rd Edition)
Publisher: Prentice Hall PTR
Authors: Bruce Eckel
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Excellent for both code and concepts...


I come from a procedural language background, and much of the object-oriented concepts and terminology are new for me. I've read and worked through other books (of the "Teach Yourself ..." variety), and I've come away still trying to piece together the overall framework with little success. This book is excellent for providing you with the concepts of what OOP is and how it relates to Java.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: The Guru's Guide to Transact-SQL
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Ken Henderson
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Beautifully written, and not just for Gurus.


I HIGHLY recommend 'The Guru's Guide to Transact-SQL'. Although the book is dated (doesn't cover OLAP and other SQL-7 features), it is superbly written stylistically (probably the best-written technical book I've EVER read). The writing style is concise, elegant and most importantly, not antagonzing.
The book is stuffed with little tidbits and fills in LOTS of blanks. Within the first few pages I learned that a blank time in a timedate field evaluates to midnight, and that can cause problems:
"The following example uses the BETWEEN operator to return orders occuring between October 1990 and May 1995, Inclusively. I've included the time with the second of the two dates because without it, the time would default to midnight (SQL Server datetime columns always store both the date and time; an omitted time defaults to midnight), making the query noninclusive. Without specification of the time portion, the query would return only orders placed up through the first millisecond of May 31.
SELECT ordernumber, orderdate, amount FROM orders Where orderdate BETWEEN '10/01/90' AND '05/31/95 23:59:59.999'"
Note the clarity of the writing and the clear capitalization scheme used. Moreover, this is important stuff. I never would've guessed that SQL Server is that dumb, and it's really necessary to know . For all I know, they may have fixed this on 7.0, but I still have clients on 6.5).
Obviously from this example you can see that you don't have to be an aspiring guru yourself to get a lot out of it. Don't let the title scare you off: it's fine for beginners and will get you way beyond beginner's level quickly.
It will take you as far as you want to go, if you put in the time and effort.
I consider it a must on any SQL bookshelf (now, if only they'd update to include OLAP, DTS etc.).