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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Advanced .NET Remoting (C# Edition)
Publisher: Apress
Authors: Ingo Rammer
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
The best choice to learn the basics and inners of .NET Remot


This is the best book to start with the basics of .NET Remoting. It has lots of very clear examples that will help you to understand all you need to program distributed applications using the .NET framework and the .NET remoting. When you are able to develop your own programs Ingo Rammer shows you the inners of .NET remoting to allow you to know how the things are working behind the scenes. Really, the best choice!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Core Mac Osx And Unix Programming
Publisher: Big Nerd Ranch
Authors: Mark Dalrymple, Aaron Hillegass
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Book from great people


I bought some months ago "Cocoa programming for Mac OS X" written by the same author A. Hillegass. It was the key book for me to understand the Cocoa. Now I write my own applications and I am sure the next book from The Big Nerd Ranch will help me to discover next areas of the Mac OS X Programming.
However it is a pity that Amazon.com tells us it is a bargain (nearly 30% off the catalog price $97.95). On the Big Nerd Ranch there is a link to a company which sells this book for $65.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Programming Perl (3rd Edition)
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Larry Wall, Tom Christiansen, Jon Orwant
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Doesn't get any better!


This book has absolutly everything you'll need to know about Perl. The only other book I would recommend is Learning Perl from O'Reilly. I develop CGIs for a job, and this book is an invaluable reference. I have been much impressed with this book. BUY IT! =)



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: XSLT Cookbook
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Sal Mangano
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Excellent Examples but Limited Use for Beginners


Summary: Excellent Examples but Limited Use for Beginners
I'm half-way through the "XSLT Cookbook" and I must say I like this author's style. Compared to my level, Sal Mangano is a master at writing style-sheets; however, I never feel as though he is writing down to me. While most of the book is composed of cut-and-dry material, Mr. Mangano also provides just enough (but no more) interesting and slightly humorous ideas to prevent distraction.
The examples are pretty useful on their own for the programmer who is just learning the language), and they also prompted some stimulating ideas for my own projects. I especially find the chapters "Extending and Embedding XSLT" and "XML to XML" helpful (although the example in section 12.6 seems incomplete with no include statements). I would have preferred a little more details on embedding Saxon in Java, but the references provided (and the sample chapter of "Java and XSLT" from O'Reilly's web site) more than enough details to get me started.
Even though there are several highlights of the book, the solutions presented are a little hard to figure out (since, as a beginner, I don't yet read the Extensible Style sheet Language fluently) so a second book or tutorial is recommended for those who are generally unfamiliar with or unconfident using XSLT and XPath. The second edition should definitely have a **brief** reference or tutorial for 'us' beginners. In chapter two, he also mentions discussing trig functions, but Mr. Mangano only gives one sentence and no examples for their XSLT solutions. Although I can guess at their implementation (using a series that I constantly use in my Complex Analysis class), I wish the author would still have included such an example. Despite these flaws, I highly recommend Sal Mangano's manuscript as an addition for anyone who is learning XSLT or just wants a quick solution to a common problem.