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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Oracle Developer Advanced Forms and Reports
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Osborne Media
Authors: Peter Koletzke, Paul Dorsey
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Finally, a developer book worth having on my bookshelf


There are plenty of beginner books on the market, and some are actually helpful. There was one question that was never answered though -- "OK, I can build a block. Now what? " Peter and Paul have answered this question perfectly. So well in fact that the 1 copy I bought for the office is not enough. This book has become mandatory for my employees to have in their library.
Top this off with the interview questions they provide for managers and this book is the most well rounded book to date. If you, or any of your people, are using Developer for your projects, this book is a must.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: How to Wow : Photoshop for Photography (Wow!)
Publisher: Peachpit Press
Authors: Jack Davis, Ben Willmore
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
A step-by-step instructional walkthrough of real projects


The collaboration of digital imagery experts Jack Davis and Ben Willmore, How To WOW Photoshop For Photography covers Adobe Photoshop 7 and later versions for both Macintosh and Windows platforms at an Intermediat to Advanced user level classification. A step-by-step instructional walkthrough of real projects teach the reader through experience to take advantage of Photoshop's ability to enhance quality and image flexibility in a very short time. An accompanying CD-ROM makes getting started simple, with easy-to-follow lessons that anyone can assimilate to improve their skills. Recommended for amateur and professional Photoshop users alike.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: JavaScript: The Definitive Guide
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: David Flanagan
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
As good as reviewed


I purchased the Netscape One Developer's Guide thinking it would provide answers to my Javascript questions - it answered very few, unfortunately. The 'Guide' doesn't begin to approach the ease of use, thoroughness or amount of information contained in "Javascript: The Definitive Guide". Javascript is as completely covered as it can be (with the free-flowing nature of WWW specifications, its hard to keep track of all the changes). I found the descriptions and examples informative, clear and concise and kinda fun sometimes. The layed back nature of the writing won't scare off novice coders/web developers and yet doesn't turn off more advanced developers. The book is cut in half - the first provides an introduction into Javascript and discusses its more important subjects while the second is a complete reference section for Javascript 1.2. It specifically treats the differences between Netscape and Internet Explorer whereas the Netscape One guide left that up to the reader to figure out - an oversight which relegates the Netscape One Developer's Handbook to the dusty bookshelf (way in the back). If you're doing web development and need to use Javascript - this is probably the only book you'll need. If you're doing web development and you're not using Javascript - you NEED this book - it will show you what you can do with simple client-side scripts.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Head First Servlets & JSP
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Bryan Basham, Kathy Sierra, Bert Bates
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Makes learning JSP fun


This book is unlike any other work on JSP. The idea is to take a topic that is dry as a bone, like JSP, and make it fun and interesting from start to finish. That's not an easy job. I have to give the authors of this book a lot of credit for keeping up with a whacky writing style and offbeat humor for almost nine hundred pages. That is quite an accomplishment.

The book could have been a lot thinner. Each page is loaded with graphics and has a lot less text than you are used to. But that's the point. The idea is to coat the topic in a sugar pill of fun so that you can get through it, and maybe retain a little on exam day.

I recommend this book to anyone prepping for the SCWCD, who doesn't mind a new approach to learning a dry as a bone technical topic. I also think this is a fine book for anyone who wants to learn about JSP for their job. As well as for people looking for an example of a novel approach to teaching technical topics.