Sponsored links


Valid XHTML 1.0!
Valid CSS!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Programming Perl (3rd Edition)
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Larry Wall, Tom Christiansen, Jon Orwant
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
A hard earned tip for tutorial use


This is by far the best Perl book I have ever read, I have had no other book recommended to me more highly. As with all O'Reilly books, this one beats the competitors hands-down.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Programming C#, 4th Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Jesse Liberty
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
This is THE book to learn C#


Very very easy to read. Full of good examples. It grabs you by the hand and teaches you step by step everything about C# in simple, understandable words. Provides examples on every topic, makes comparation between C#, VB.NET, C/C++ and Java. I was eager to learn C# but I did not want to read from a hard, meticulous book. I found this book and it was awesome reading it, and when you less know it you are finished reading these +600 pages book and already programming C#. If you are still deciding which book to purchase, there are good books out there, but THIS ONE is a definitive good decision to acquire and read.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Oracle High Performance Tuning for 9i and 10g
Publisher: Digital Press
Authors: Gavin JT Powell
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Good book!


It is a good book. From it, I learned more knowledge deeply.Hope more people benefited from this book!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Designing Embedded Hardware
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: John Catsoulis
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Well worth the read


While I don't know if I could build my own embedded device after reading just this book (I don't think I'd be able to this after pretty much any one book), I still felt like this book still delivered on that promise more so than any other single hardware book I've read. So many books gloss over details, either because knowledge is assumed (which is fine in many cases), or because the author doesn't have the detailed knowledge to begin with. And even when the data is in the book, far too often it's exactly that: book data, repackaged information from other sources (often books themselves). It's much better when the knowledge ultimately comes from the author's experiences. Most of the knowledge in this book really seems to be of the latter, and better, variety. I also thought the detailed introductions to a wide range of topics were 'just right' - not too high-level, so they glossed over important details or the underlying fundamentals of how the particular thing worked, but also not so low-level that they assumed knowledge I would have had to go find elsewhere. This goes for a lot of different protocols (RS-232, RS-422, SPI, I2C, USB, and so on) as well as technologies (what's a DSP exactly?).