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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Beginning C# Objects: From Concepts to Code
Publisher: Apress
Authors: Jacquie Barker, Grant Palmer
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Look no further, people!


For years I suffered from confusion regarding general object-oriented methodology. I'd read books that dealt with the syntax of object-oriented features, but none of these books dealt with the big picture of object-oriented architecture. They take you through the first steps ("this is how you define a class...", "this is how one class inherits from another...", etc) but none of them dealt with the next logical phase of learning; i.e. how do you "do" object-orientation in your software? In addition to that glaring deficiency, many of the books were difficult to read, being a tad bit academic and on the dry side...and some were completely dehydrated!

Imagine my surprise when I happened upon this book. Without a doubt this was everything I needed in a book like this. Very well written with a refreshingingly informal style, the book starts out explaining C#'s syntax and powerful features. From the very beginning of the book the authors tie-in what you're learning with a case study of how to design and implement a system with a modestly complex internal data structure (a student registration system for university courses). Examples are very clear, there are plenty of nice little nuggets of advice (things that you should get in the habit of doing) and most importantly WHY you should do these things (backed up with brief, easy to understand code).

Read this book from beginning to end. Then, read it again. It's very easy reading and won't take long to get through, especially if you're familiar with many object-oriented principles. I think you'll find yourself having many "AHA!" moments when reading. You'll be on your way to being a fully competant software architect ready to take on big projects with confidence. I only wish I had a book like this 5 years ago.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Network Marketing for Dummies
Publisher: For Dummies
Authors: Zig Ziglar, John P. Hayes
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Network Marketing for Everybody !


As one of the contributors to this book, I was even more pleased with the finished result than I had imagined. Of course, many people in our organization have purchased Network Marketing for Dummies... the first of whom was so inspired after reading the expert advice and detailed descriptions of Network Marketing (including invaluable tips from a variety of industry leaders) that in less than 60 days she became our company's fastest 4-star Manager in Canada ! Many others have also achieved record-setting results, and credit much of their success to the basic training and business-building strategies presented in Network Marketing for Dummies. This book is an excellent orientation for anyone curious about the industry, as well an essential "field guide" for network marketers wishing to take their business to the next level...



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: A Programmer's Guide to Java Certification: A Comprehesive Primer, Second Edition
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Khalid Mughal, Rolf Rasmussen
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Tests the minimal subset of Java


Perhaps the best advice I can give you on this book is by describing what it does NOT cover. Why? Well I opened this book and went to see its coverage of JTree, on which I have spent a lot of time using. But, no JTree?! Gosh, then I started looking for other Swing widgets. Nothing! No AWT either. Then I looked at the example exam. Indeed, no graphics are tested.
The book is exactly defined for one purpose, passing the Certification Test. So it describes only that which is tested. Amazingly, huge sections of standard Java are omitted, quite apart from the abovementioned graphics. As far as I can tell, you do NOT need to know internationalisation, input/output, XML parsers, resource bundles, crypto or even the network modules.
It appears that the test is more or less about the class structure of java and the associated syntax, plus other elementary syntactical manipulations.
Why is it important for you to know what the book omits? I am assuming that you are time-constrained; you are probably wanting to study for the test on your own time. I figure you have a day job, or full time classes. [If I am wrong, then good for you, but I am being conservative.] So you need to be very focused about what you need to study. Maybe you know some of the omitted packages, but you are not exactly fluent in them. So you held off taking the test, until you gained more experience. Your worries may well have been unnecessary. No more excuses for procrastinating.
Therefore I hope this message is reassuring. The book can save you a lot of time!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Intermediate Robot Building
Publisher: Apress
Authors: David Cook
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
A course in analog electronics


Very cool narrative aimed straight at the hardcore tinkerer. For the restless kid inside you, that really digged hands on experience, and who perhaps is left neglected by all this software/web browsing.
There are sections of the book that could have been written in the 1970s and 1980s. Like chapters 9 and 10, Driving Miss Motor and Driving Mister Motor. The descriptions of the discrete components and putting them together on a breadboard in something like an npn or pnp motor driver circuit seem so much from that period. Nothing wrong about this, I might add. Much of the progress in electronics has been at ever decreasing dimensions of logic circuitry. But at the macroscopic level, where you might have to supply enough power to move a robot, for instance, much of the lessons of then are still state of the art.
Cook provides here a grand tour of many tasks you might need to perform to make a nifty robot. Quite aside from whic, it also gives you a good exposure to analog electronics and electromechanical design.