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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Beginning Perl for Bioinformatics
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: James Tisdall
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
popular for a reason


I checked this book out from the school library, and had to put a recall notice on it to get it, and then a recall notice was put back on it from me. It's popular for a reason: it's an excellent primer, and I've decided to just buy a copy for myself.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Swing, Second Edition
Publisher: Manning Publications
Authors: Matthew Robinson, Pavel Vorobiev
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Strongly impressed


I am a 10 year veteran programmer in C, C++ and recently, Java (but not GUI). My transition from C++ to Java was fairly simple and I am now a great fan of Java. This book was my first introduction to Java Swing--not a good experience. This book lacks the fundamental big picture aspects of Swing and dives right into the details, making it appear more complicated than it really is.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Learning the vi Editor (6th Edition)
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Linda Lamb, Arnold Robbins
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Vi is the best editor....


Inspite of being as old as it is, vi is simply the best editor. Last week, I ran into an unusual situation. One of my files from a scientific package grew very big (something like 1 GB). I tried emacs, dtpad and all the other editors on it and they all gave up, either with an error message or without one. I was amazed to see vi OPEN the file after 3 minutes. Old is Gold! Vi saved the day for me!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Expert One-on-One J2EE Design and Development (Programmer to Programmer)
Publisher: Wrox
Authors: Rod Johnson
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Exceptional in Every Way


I've read allot of books based on languages, Java and J2EE. Most follow the standard format(s) of API's explained or focus, in detail, on one particular aspect or approach; say patterns. What's unique about this book is that it seems to fill all the cracks left between the "generalist" and the "specialist" books.
Almost with an odd supernatural poetry Rod has managed to slip into most the holes left by the trail of Authors before him. With a welcomed, in-your-face honesty, the author explains where certain aspects of the J2EE architacture work, and where its wasted techno-flex; I've EJB'ed, therefore I am.
Refreshing. You will leave wiser for the walk-of-words, but keep a reference handy as this book isn't meant to be one. It's meant to be in all the places a reference just doesn't manage to go.