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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: HTML & XHTML: The Definitive Guide, Fifth Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Chuck Musciano, Bill Kennedy
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Excellent reference--a *must* for serious web developers


The reviews for "HTML & XHTML" by Musciano and Kennedy are already overwhelmingly positive (save a few disgruntled readers here and there). I can see why readers heap so much praise upon this book. The author's intent is to show the reader how to write clean HTML, arguing that since web surfers can always change their browsers' appearance settings, content is still more important than style. I am a rookie at making web pages, yet after tinkering with HTML for a few days, I had already found myself thumbing through the book for reference.
I am not a programmer, and I think novices could still appreciate this book. However, I *strongly* recommend that potential readers have some exposure to HTML and understand how it works before purchasing. (Check out Jennifer Niederst's excellent "Learning Web Design" if you need a tutorial on the Internet and HTML.) In any case, the book is mainly geared towards experienced programmers, but I honestly believe that anyone can get the most out of this book if they are willing to experiment with HTML continually through trial and error.



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: The Protocols (TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1)
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: W. Richard Stevens
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
If I could, I would replace all rfcs with this book.


If you're into learning the underlying concepts of some of the most used protocols (ip, icmp, udp, and all those encapsulated in the aforementioned ones), there's no way around it! I've bought this book as soon as a friend of mine told me the following, which I'll quote "If you want to become a ninja in TCP/IP, you'll likely need to have this book at hand."; I found the book quite annoying in the beginning, due to the simple fact that I had recently read the book "O'reilly: TCP/IP Network Administration". I've dropped reading this one for like 2 months, and when I've started reading it back, It all went so utterly better. The book covers a lot of protocols, one of which I found very useful was DNS, because the available RFC's were generally not-so-easy(tm) to follow and understand; and after reading the chapter on DNS, It all turned to be much more simple than I found it be when reading the relevant RFC's. The book is a definitive guide for anyone, and should be used as such, for coverage and implementation you should read the book entitled "UNIX Network Programming" by the same author, Mr. W. Stevens (which unfortunately has passed away)



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Head First EJB (Brain-Friendly Study Guides)
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Kathy Sierra, Bert Bates
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Dare to admit that learning is fun


Sierra and Bates has got the courage to stand up for the fact that we *do* learn better if we think it is fun.
What I like in particular is their approach to focus on the central concepts and using a lot of humor to get the most important understanding across to the reader/learner.
I have made (unpaid) reviews of two chapters of this book before publishing, so the approach is no big surprise to me. However, I am happy to see that the rest of the book keep the same high standard. I give it my best recommendations.
This is the book for people who dare to admit to themselves that learning is fun.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Programming the Perl DBI
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Alligator Descartes, Tim Bunce
Rating: 1/5
Customer opinion - 1 stars out of 5
DO NOT BUY


This is just a rewrite of a very badly written DBI docs. This is a very useless book. The supporters and authors of this book are very egotistic and encapsulated in their own world. Perl DBI newsgroup supporters dbi-users@isc.org are even more egotistic. What you get in the man pages is the same as what you get from the book -- a lot of useless documentation.