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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Exceptional C++: 47 Engineering Puzzles, Programming Problems, and Solutions
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Herb Sutter
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Helps you leap from an intermediate to advanced programmer


If you think differently after reading a book it was worth the money. This book is such.You should also take a look at "effective/more effective C++" and "C++ effective object-oriented software construction". They helped me too.



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: Advanced Programming in the UNIX(R) Environment
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: W. Richard Stevens
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Mandatory


I just can't believe there are people who actually rate this at one star! Hey, have you read at least one chapter? I don't think so! Argh!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Assembly Language Step-by-step: Programming with DOS and Linux (with CD-ROM)
Publisher: Wiley
Authors: Jeff Duntemann
Rating: 1/5
Customer opinion - 1 stars out of 5
Assembler for who?


While this author is articulate, I really can't imagine anyone who would do well to read this book. I am a professional programmer, and I have dabbled with assembler languages twice in my life (once in college and once with the Apple II Z80). I have followed the common wisdom and totally avoided assembler until now, when I'm trying to tune up the inner loops of a 3D real-time rendering engine. So maybe I'm not the novice that this book was intended for...but I read the first 90 pages (from start to end, as recommended by the author), and have learned nothing about assembler. What I have learned is that computers are like people. Why? Because when people get too busy, they make to-do lists and follow them, one task at a time - just like the way computers execute one instruction at a time. That's the gist of Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we spend 30 pages learning that in hex, you have to sometimes add with a carry, and subtract with a borrow, just like we learned in elementary school. In Chapter 3, "Lifting the hood", we learn that chapter 1 was a bit oversimplified - in fact, computers can change the sequence of executing their to-do lists. This revelation is at the very end of Chapter three, in Italics, on page >>71<<: "The CPU can change its course of execution based on the work it has been doing". To sum up Chapter 3, he quotes Ted Nelson: "The computer is a box that follows a plan". He concludes that Ted is "one of those very rare people who have the infuriating habit of being right most of the time." I got as far as page 90 and gave up. I know - if I am serious about assembler, I shouldn't expect to learn it overnight, but life is short. Then I went to another book on assembler and learned the command "MOVZX" - copy a small value (eg, 8-bit byte) and expand it with zero's into a large register (eg, 32-bit). This seemed rather important to me (at the time) because "MOV" will not load an 8 bit quantity into a 32-bit register. To learn this instruction from a novice point of view, I went back to "Step-by-step", looked in the index, and found that this is NEVER mentioned in the book - in all 598 pages! There is another solution (xor eax,eax; mov al,<8-bit-value>; <use 32-bit eax>), but I expect a 600 page book to at least mention a complete list of the x86 instruction set. It seems that for this, you will need to find another book.



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Administrator's Companion
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Authors: Bill English, Walter J. Glenn
Rating: 1/5
Customer opinion - 1 stars out of 5
This book has many faults


This book helped me come up to speed in Exchange Server 2003 when I got sort of thrown into supporting it at work. It sounds like that last reviewr didn't get past the intro material. The first part of this book is all about architecture and planning. It was kind of dry and a bit more than I was ready for just learning about Exchange. But, starting with chapter 7, the book is all action. It takes you through installing, setting up recipients, storage groups, routing groups, administrative groups, and everything you need to know to get a server up and going. It has a great section on security. I get asked a lot of questions about that at work. It even talks about disaster recovery and performance tuning. The writings pretty easy to follow. They use lots of supporting pictures and step by step explanations. I just skipped the first 6 chapters and plan to come back to them after I've been using it a while.