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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: SQL Queries for Mere Mortals: A Hands-On Guide to Data Manipulation in SQL
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Michael J. Hernandez, John L. Viescas
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Finally, SQL in layman's terms!


Structured Query Language is "underneath the covers" of all of our relational databases, but is sometimes less than intuitive when it comes to writing SQL statements, scripts and stored procedures. True to his easy to understand style from his book "Database Design for Mere Mortals," Mr. Hernandez, along with John Viescas, has a book which is straightforward enough for me to recommend to my students who wish to learn more about SQL itself.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Linux Device Drivers, 3rd Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Jonathan Corbet, Alessandro Rubini, Greg Kroah-Hartman
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
A good book, if you know what your doing


Does contain lots of interesting info about Linux drivers and Linux in general. But the meat is more reference than tutorial. A really great tutorial begins chapter two, and so I thought here I'm really going to learn everything I need to know about creating Linux drivers. Didn't turn out that way. After you work the first exercise, that is, the tutorial example at the beginning of chapter two, you have seen the last of the complete examples. From here on it's code fragments and isolated functions. The author obviously could have written the book we need. But he didn't. It's a valuable book, but it's not a tutorial. What a beginner needs are whole, complete, real, listings of programs that work. Which reminds me, a real driver that drives a real device, presented in its entirety, with all details of how to compile it, and how to run it, would have been far more instructive than a "driver" that reads and writes only in memory so that it can be "portable" across many Linux platforms. A portable driver probably is a neat stunt that impresses existing gurus, but that's not the group that needs this book. To see what I'm driving at, look at Kernighan and Pike's "The UNIX Programming Environment." Their big programming project is indeed presented in fragments and isolated functions in their chapter eight, but the entire project just as it will appear on your disk is listed in the appendix. If Rubini had followed that model his book could have been really instructive. But he didn't. So there's an opportunity here. Some guru should set down and assemble these fragments into the book we need.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Programming Perl (3rd Edition)
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Larry Wall, Tom Christiansen, Jon Orwant
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
A real Perl bible


It has been a long time ago when I started to experiment with Perl scripts and my highest handicap was that I had had no good book to learn Perl. Then I discovered Programming Perl in my local bookstore, bought it and learnt all main Perl features and tricks within a week!
Believe it or not, it is true story. If you want to start writing well-programmed and robust Perl scripts or applications, this book is the greatest option to start with. It slowely and understandably introduces you into Perl itself, each feature and method is closely described and everything is explained by lots of examples which highlight how it is easy to write any routine in Perl by several lines instead of long and hard-to-understand code in some other languages. Your programs will be no longer amateur and suffering low performance when you learn, for example, how to effectively use $_ variable or file handler tricks. I could write several pages describing a huge amount of Perl programming technologies covered in this book.
Although I am an experienced Perl programmer now, I still open Programming Perl from time to time, just to recall how to handle some script features which are hard to remember.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Thinking in Java (3rd Edition)
Publisher: Prentice Hall PTR
Authors: Bruce Eckel
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Excellent Primer


I highly recommend this book to anyone learning the Java language. Bruce has a writing style that makes it easy to understand the points he is making. It is much better then Beginning Java 2 by Horton, Eckel has good examples unlike Horton who likes to get caught up in mathematical concepts instead of programming concepts. I will definitely be going back to this book to use as a reference.