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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: C# for Java Developers
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Authors: Allen Jones, Adam Freeman
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Highly Recommended


This is a fantastic book - not only does it cover the syntax of the language, but it also provides great coverage of the class libraries.
If you are a Java developer who wants to learn C#, then thisbook is just perfect.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Inside C#, Second Edition
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Authors: ANDREW WHITECHAPE TOM ARCHER
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Well done - Best of breed


For the first time in a long time I sat down and actually enjoyed learning from a technical book! How many times have we purchased a book only to be driven to bed by some wannabe's author's feeble attempts at humor and wit? However, a book written by someone that has a good writing style wouldn't do me much good (or you for that matter if you're looking at this book) if it didn't also "cut the mustard" on the technical side. Believe me, I've read every single C# book on the market and this is BY FAR the best of the lot.
PROS: Great introduction to the type system, classes, operators and operator overloading. Also, major kudos for including several .net chapters on multithreading, reflection and com interoperability.
CONS: Would like to have seen a better opening chapter on oop. Would also like to see more .net stuff - especially winforms. However, since the book's focus is C#, I really couldn't take off for that omission.
Anyway, in final, a really well done book and one that I will keep handy for a good while to come.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Beginning Linux Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
Publisher: Wrox
Authors: Richard Stones, Neil Matthew, Alan Cox
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Excellent Introduction for Linux Programming and more...


I found this book an excellent introduction for wide range of topics which can be roughly bundled as Linux programming topics (but I think that there's more inside). If you're looking for a book which will cover many topics in a quick-yet-not-that-shallow tutorial, then I highly recommend this book. This book covers many, many important topics from the basics of Linux/UNIX such as terminals, shell programming(scripting), through more proramming issues like Inter Programming Communication (IPC), X programming, debugging and building issues under Linux to the more sysadmin oriented topics such as Perl, HTML programming, etc'. It also includes many other important things, which can be easily viewed in it's TOC... . What I can add is that it's explanation and building of the chapters is very good. This book covers many topics so each chapter isn't too deep, but yet not shallow at all. Most of the time, at the right ratio.
So, all in all, I think the authors did a good job in the balance between delving into details and coverage of wide range of topics.
I recommend this book to the following: 1. Junior sysadmins (like me!): just make sure you go through an extensive C/C++ tutorial (C++ even better) before getting this one. Go through *all* of this book's chapters. It'll teach you ALOT more than you know about Linux and it'll give you in depth understanding of many things. 2. Programmers in Linux: Well, this is just your first step but, IMHO, it's very important to know your surroundings even if you'de never mess with some of the book's stuff in the future. 3. Every "Linux lover"/hacker (not cracker!) out there. Get this book. you'll love it. It'll feed you with a perfect mixture of topics/details about the Linux system.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Metadata Solutions: Using Metamodels, Repositories, XML, and Enterprise Portals to Generate Information on Demand
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Adrienne Tannenbaum
Rating: 3/5
Customer opinion - 3 stars out of 5
where's the tools and urls?


Pros: discusses the real pitfalls in trying to keep repositories up to date.Cons: 1. This whole meta metadata terminology suffers from technojargonitis...simple words that justify return on investment are needed2. Where's the working tools or urls to sites that you might find tools? A book that neither includes a CD nor references to internet sites for further research seems out of date.