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Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: Assembly Language for Intel-Based Computers (4th Edition)
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Authors: Kip R. Irvine
Rating: 1/5
Customer opinion - 1 stars out of 5
Does NOT Make The Grade


I have recently completed a university course in Assembly Language programming. The instructor opted to use this book as the text for the course. First, the book is riddled with typos that are serious errors which can confuse a student into a state of mindless frustration. I would like to write a lengthy review, but for the sake of brevity, I can tell all in the few words that follow. In short, I shelved the book during the duration of the course and read "Peter Norton's Assembly Language Guide." I received a 4.0 (A) in the course which others who continued using the Irvine book struggled to make a passing mark. If all the errors are corrected in the text, this might be a worthwhile reference, but as it stands, it's more damaging than helpful. No offense intended for the author, just a bit of constructive criticism.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Essential CVS
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Jennifer Vesperman
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Very informative, but not very well organized


Essential CVS by Jennifer Vesperman is a very informative book on CVS ever published. Most developers working with CVS - Concurrent Versions System - will appreciate tips, tricks details provided by the author. It covers all the aspects of managing projects using CVS that most of us will ever need.
I especially appreciate the author's discussion on tagging and branching strategies. She compares available branching strategies, talks about pros and cons of each in details to help you pick the one you see more fit.
She also provides tips and tricks, ranging from absurd (such as switching your sandbox by editing your CVS/Repository file) to intimidating (such as playing with the repositories directly). These tips will help you understand the system's internals, which hopefully will result in productivity (if not in disaster).
At first, I found her discussions a bit redundant - you can read the same point repeated several times on the same page or the same chapter over and over. Although it annoyed me to some extent, people not familiar with CVS may appreciate this feature of the book.
She assumes her audience to be familiar with UNIX systems. Although I'm fine with it (I live in Linux), others may not be. Most of the UNIX-related chat are found in her file-utility commands, as well as bash scripts, in addition to some user account/group management.
The organization and writing style of the book is far from ideal. CVS itself is a very exciting topic for software developers. The author of Essential CVS fails to reflect this in her discussions. Her discussions are close to manpage-style, with some detour onto tips and suggestions from time to time.
I believe ideal style for a book on CVS would be a scenario-driven style, which introduces a project, a problem related with managing it, and advances into the features of CVS one solution at a time. Realize, that is it different from cook-book style, which is a Question & Answer styled writing.
Good examples of scenario-driven styled writing are "Apache The Definitive Guide" by O'reilly, which builds a server with a tiny configuration file, and advances to more feature-ful implementation; "MySQL" book of New Riders, which introduces a conventional grade book and advances into more complex RDBMS implementation of it; "DNS and BIND" of O'reilly and etc.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Essential CVS
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Jennifer Vesperman
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Very informative, but not very well organized


Essential CVS by Jennifer Vesperman is a very informative book on CVS ever published. Most developers working with CVS - Concurrent Versions System - will appreciate tips, tricks details provided by the author. It covers all the aspects of managing projects using CVS that most of us will ever need.
I especially appreciate the author's discussion on tagging and branching strategies. She compares available branching strategies, talks about pros and cons of each in details to help you pick the one you see more fit.
She also provides tips and tricks, ranging from absurd (such as switching your sandbox by editing your CVS/Repository file) to intimidating (such as playing with the repositories directly). These tips will help you understand the system's internals, which hopefully will result in productivity (if not in disaster).
At first, I found her discussions a bit redundant - you can read the same point repeated several times on the same page or the same chapter over and over. Although it annoyed me to some extent, people not familiar with CVS may appreciate this feature of the book.
She assumes her audience to be familiar with UNIX systems. Although I'm fine with it (I live in Linux), others may not be. Most of the UNIX-related chat are found in her file-utility commands, as well as bash scripts, in addition to some user account/group management.
The organization and writing style of the book is far from ideal. CVS itself is a very exciting topic for software developers. The author of Essential CVS fails to reflect this in her discussions. Her discussions are close to manpage-style, with some detour onto tips and suggestions from time to time.
I believe ideal style for a book on CVS would be a scenario-driven style, which introduces a project, a problem related with managing it, and advances into the features of CVS one solution at a time. Realize, that is it different from cook-book style, which is a Question & Answer styled writing.
Good examples of scenario-driven styled writing are "Apache The Definitive Guide" by O'reilly, which builds a server with a tiny configuration file, and advances to more feature-ful implementation; "MySQL" book of New Riders, which introduces a conventional grade book and advances into more complex RDBMS implementation of it; "DNS and BIND" of O'reilly and etc.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Dynamic HTML: The Definitive Reference (2nd Edition)
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Danny Goodman
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Fabulous book


From the beginner to a well-seasoned programmer, this book adds a lot of value to your collection. The book gives you great examples and reasoning behind the different techniques that should be observed while creating any website. Plus, there are very detailed chapters devoted to HTML, DOM, CSS, and JavaScript references. I would definately recommend this book.