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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: The Photoshop Book for Digital Photographers
Publisher: New Riders Press
Authors: Scott Kelby
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
WOW


This book really has it all. Great step-by-step instructions. Good for beginners. It has really inspired me to learn more.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Mind Hacks (Hacks)
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Tom Stafford, Matt Webb
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Interesting book, but few <em>hacks</em>


Here's a book to learn about what modern instruments have taught us about how our mind works. In that sense, knowing the machine is a first step to hack it, but it falls short of doing that. Knowing how to cheat our sight, or how unconscious mimicry work is interesting, but the authors fall short of telling us how to use it for fun and profit.
There's another area where this book falters: differences between male and female mind; it only mentions it when talking about orientation, but I'm pretty sure (positive, sometimes) that there are differences in perception, and possibly in memory processing.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
Publisher: New Riders Press
Authors: Steve Krug
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
An Enlightening Read


As a computer programmer, the time I invest into content and design has never expanded beyond web accessiblity standards and Google Pagerank/other SEO adjustments. This book has given me a new skill and requirement I feel I must implement for the good of the web. I think a computer programmer and a photoshop guru could read this book and both walk away with a deeper understanding of "usability". Techie's usually just think in terms of simplifing forms and link structures and designers in terms of presentation, visual appeal, colors, etc. However Steve Krug shows that usability is much more that both of these combined. Which apparently is why Steve has a career as a usability consultant; because the designers and the coders haven't been filling this role.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Authors: Katie Hafner
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
An 8 not a 10.


The book is chock-full of information on Arpa and ArpaNet, but sort of slacks off around 1987.I guess that's only to be expected, the idea was to chronicle the beginnings of the Internet and by the late 80s it was too large for such a slim book to do that era justice.If you want to learn about how the original ArpaNet was put together, the people behind it, and how the Internet's technical foundations were laid, the book is excellent. If you're interested in how Usenet started, how the Web came to be what it is, this isn't the book you want. The book covers the older history, and skims over recent events. It's still quite a valuable addition to your bookshelf. I'm sure someone will come along one day and write a history of the web, usenet, irc and the evolution of MUSHes. The book reads very easily, I thought the balance between the technical and the dramatic story was perfect.