Sponsored links


Valid XHTML 1.0!
Valid CSS!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Programming ASP.NET, 2nd Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Jesse Liberty, Dan Hurwitz
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Strongly Recommend


Ever since I read Jesse Liberty's "Programming C#", I've been eagerly awaiting the release of his "Programming ASP.NET". I received the book recently and just finished going through the 900 pages. Writing style is very lucid as expected (one of very few technical authors who succeed in this aspect. Another such author is Doug Walther of "XML for ASP.Net"). Though Programming ASP.NET begins with a simple "Hello World" example, by page 20, it has you creating a data table based on a datagrid connected to the Northwind database. This early demonstration of ASP.NET's power leads to an "aha" moment and keeps you going. It is refreshing to have the code work as promised. Unlike other ASP.NET books which address both VB and C# communities but show a marked preference for one or the other language, virtually every example in this book is given in both languages. I read only the C# examples, and reckon about 1/4th of the 900 pages catered to code in the "other" language. There are several screenshots of how to carry out various tasks in ASP.NET that are very useful for beginners. Similarly, screenshots of results from example programs are also very helpful. This book is "self-contained" for any concepts it discusses. You don't need to run to another book to seek clarifications. For me, this is the one book that brought together every aspect of ASP.NET, from hands-on "how to handle the development tool and set up files and directories" tasks, to conceptual issues. And the beauty is the whole discussion doesn't seem disjointed given its scope. I guess this is the advantage of having only one/two authors. The one minor criticism (may be just my personal preference) is, in the chapters on Accessing Data with ADO.NET, I wish there was (i) a short discussion of further abstraction between UI and a database made possible by using XML, and (ii) creating strongly typed datasets from XML schemas (using the xsd.exe tool for example) but likely it is outside the scope of the book to discuss this (in fact creating XML schemas and reading XML data files are addressed in later chapters through examples, so (i) is taken care of. And (ii) is too specific to warrant being a critical point). I strongly recommend this book as an essential reference to ASP.NET.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Learning Perl, Third Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Randal L. Schwartz, Tom Phoenix
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
a good book


Most of the book flows: smooth, logical, heuristic. A very good introduction to what can be a confusing language. Best book I've seen for a programmer to use to pick up a new language. You will want the companion camel book, Programming Perl, for reference; but don't try to learn Perl from the camel book unless you are a masochist.
Two free bits of advice. Skip the first chapter. If you want to learn Perl, you know why. There is enough stuff in the first chapter to stifle the impulse if you read it carefully.
Second, practice your skimming skills on the second chapter. Then go back and re-read it carefully when you're fresh. It's long and important, but when you've got past this chapter, you'll roll the rest of the way through the book.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Adobe Premiere Pro 1.5 Studio Techniques (Studio Techniques)
Publisher: Adobe Press
Authors: Jacob Rosenberg
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
My favorite Premiere Pro 1.5 Book


I had the pleasure of meeting Jacob Rosenberg at NAB2005 and recieved my autographed copy of his book as a gift from him. Jacob shared his knowledge and passion of film making with the crowds of people for days on end and made time to answer every question throw his way. If you are looking a book on Premiere Pro 1.5, this is everyone who gets their hands on it and his mom's favorite Premiere book. The author has used his video editing knowledge of current movie making to create a book that can teach beginners and pros how to get the most out of Premiere Pro. Buy this book, it will turn anyone into a movie making expert who reads and follows Mr. Rosenberg's great advice.
Now there is my end of the deal.

Steve Solars, Las Vegas, Nv. stevesolars@cox.net



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Hacking Exposed: Network Security Secrets & Solutions, Fourth Edition (Hacking Exposed)
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Osborne Media
Authors: Stuart McClure, Joel Scambray, George Kurtz
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Time to reposition the "Hacking Exposed" series?


I am a senior engineer for network security operations. I've read and reviewed every edition of the "Hacking Exposed" series since the 1999 original. "Hacking Exposed" is a winner; the authors' powerful example-driven style teaches the tools and tactics of vulnerability assessment and penetration testing. Nevertheless, I've compared this third edition to its "Hacking Linux" and "Hacking Windows 2000" cousins, and I believe the authors should rethink their goals for the "Hacking Exposed" series. "Hacking Exposed, Third Edition" (HE:3E) describes techniques to attack and defend a wide variety of network assets: Microsoft products (9x, ME, NT, 2000, XP), UNIX variants, Novell's NOS, routers, PBXs, firewalls, and so on. Weaknesses in individual applications are explained, with attention given to remote control tools (VNC, Windows Terminal Server, PCAnywhere), Web technologies (IIS, ColdFusion, ActiveX, Java), and file sharing/chat systems (Napster, IRC). Readers are unlikely to find so many topics given fairly thorough coverage in a single volume. Unfortunately, at 727 pages, HE:3E has gained too much weight. The 1999 first edition offered 484 pages, and the 2001 (yes, 2001) second edition gave 703 pages. While the authors should be credited for not simply copying and pasting material from their 2001 edition of "Hacking Exposed: Windows 2000," many of the same topics appear in both books. Furthermore, some subjects are redundantly described within HE:3E. For example, why rehash port redirection and rootkits in chapter 14 when they were adequately covered in earlier sections? I strongly recommend the authors remove the UNIX- and Windows-specific material from a future fourth edition of "Hacking Exposed," directing readers to "Hacking Linux" and "Hacking Windows" when necessary. The authors should briefly describe general UNIX and Windows vulnerabilities in "HE:4E," and devote most of the book to their methodology and systems not covered in other books. This overhaul will give the authors a chance to remove some dated material from "Hacking Exposed," like a reference to ISS RealSecure v3.0 (6.0 is now in use). I recommend readers who have not read previous "Hacking Exposed" titles buy this book. Despite my concerns, I still learned something new (wireless issues, format string vulnerabilities) and re-acquainted myself with material mentioned in earlier editions (RIP spoofing, enumeration techniques). If you've read "Hacking Exposed, Second Edition," wait for a revamped fourth edition. (Disclaimer: I received a free review copy from the publisher.)