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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Enterprise JavaBeans, Fourth Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Richard Monson-Haefel, Bill Burke, Sacha Labourey
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
A good book to started on EJB


I just wanted to say that I found this to be good book on Enterprise Java Beans (EJB). I am currently using this book to write a few applications and found it to be useful. This is definitely not a place for JDBC reference. I don't understand why people are complaining about this book not covering JDBC.
The author covers the fundamental concepts of EJBs very much without getting bogged down with proprietary information.
I definitely recommend this book. I only thing I regret is the lack of a CD rom with the code examples. Right now, I am having to type all the code.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
Publisher: New Riders Press
Authors: Steve Krug
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Excellent Book- Easy to read


This book invites you to read it cover-to-cover. The information is presented so well, even a seasoned veteran will learn new tricks. I seek books these days with far fewer pages than the typical "Bible" or "Unleashed" series books. I demand well-presented, well thought-out content and this book delivers. The author(s) also chose to include enough comedy in their material to make the book purely enjoyable.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Linux Cookbook
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Carla Schroder
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Terrific Linux Admin Book


Carla Schroder's Linux Cookbook (O'Reilly) is an extremely dense volume packed with valuable information. The author writes with precision and detail and with a conversational style that handles the topic with a wry humor making this book a pleasure to read. The Linux Cookbook is command-line based so some familiarity with a Linux system, the inherent power of using the command-line and the dangers of using root are necessary.

The O'Reilly Cookbook series uses a problem/solution/discussion layout to deliver content in a "recipe" format. Schroder provides an extremely thorough compendium of practical solutions to common problems found in the Debian and RPM-based Linux environments. Intended for the beginner to intermediate user, this book also has lots of good nuggets for the advanced Linux systems administrator. The table of contents generously lists each topic covered with enough detail for the reader to quickly pinpoint specific problems of interest.

Briefly, topics covered: documentation (man pages, changelogs, etc.); installing and managing software on RPM-based systems and Debian-based systems; detecting hardware; JOE and Vim editors; runlevels and starting and stopping X; managing users and groups; managing files and partitions; patching, customizing and upgrading kernals; CD and DVD recording; managing the bootloader and multi-booting; Knoppix; CUPS; configuring video and managing X Windows; using rsync and Mondo Rescue for backups and creating restore discs; remote access; CVS; ntp; Postfix; Apache; Samba and DNS.

O'Reilly is well known for producing high quality books that are beautifully bound and well designed. The layout of this book is simply presented with clear typography with chapter and topic headings easily discernible and command-line sections cleanly delineated. The book opens and stays open to selected pages for ease of use (no "cracking" of bindings allowed or necessary!); most of us like to follow along with a book splayed open next to our keyboard or laptop so it's nice not to have to balance our mug of coffee on one side of the book to prop it open.

The Linux Cookbook by Carla Schroder is extremely easy to navigate and very readable thanks to the author's sensible and practical topic selection, clarity of writing and humor. In providing solutions to common problems, Schroder has also managed to disperse valuable advice along the way. Her common sense approach to Linux systems management and administration shines through. The reader gets the benefit of the author's experience in this clearly written and valuable resource to Linux. A bonus is the author's enthusiasm for her topic. This translates into a pleasurable read. Much of this information is scattered across a large number of Websites but having a single competent resource to have at hand makes this book worth owning.



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: Parallel Computer Architecture : A Hardware/Software Approach
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann
Authors: David Culler, J.P. Singh, Anoop Gupta
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
The Parallel Parallel to H&P


I guest lecture in a graduate level architecture course, and I always enjoy using this book as reference material when I want to lecture on cache coherency. This book is written from the correct perspective that obtaining parallelism is not easy, and so most of the book is spent on the various issues that come up when building a parallel machine. It is probably a good idea to read this book if you want to write parallel code, or if you just want to know why large scale supercomputers are not in wide use today.
Previous uniprocessor architecture knowledge is required for the more interesting chapters. Thus, this book acts as a nice sequel to Henessey and Patterson.