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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Apple Confidential 2.0: The Definitive History of the World's Most Colorful Company
Publisher: No Starch Press
Authors: Owen Linzmayer, Owen W. Linzmayer
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Really a very decent read


I just finished reading Apple Confidential 2.0 in two days because I literally could not put the book down. The inspiring, heartbreaking, insane, and magical story of Apple Computer is pretty incredible in its own right, but Linzmayer adds the extra level of knowledge and expertise about the subject matter that makes this book so enjoyable. It is filled with pictures, timelines, and a real attention to detail. I also really liked the asides in the margins of the book that provide all the geeky tidbits like code names, and the little aside "What ever happened to..." bios of people who come into the story. It was neat to see how many people who were only briefly a part of the Apple story ended up doing amazing things in their own right. Apple Computer truly was and is a launch pad for so many amazing people and technologies - read all about it in this very current and up-to-date book. Can't wait to read version 3.0!



Product: Book - Textbook Binding
Title: Routing TCP/IP Volume I (CCIE Professional Development)
Publisher: Cisco Press
Authors: Jeff Doyle
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
This is a really great book!


This is the first TCP/IP book I've read that really explained how a packet is routed from source to destination, and made it easy to understand. After reading this book, I now have a greater appreciation for what my friends in the Network Control Center team have to work with everday. If you have any trouble understanding how to subnet an address space, you won't by the time you finish Chapter 2. As an MCP NT admin working in a Fortune 500 7x24 command center, I think this book should be required reading for anyone working with a TCP/IP network. This is a really great book!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: The Little SAS Book: A Primer, Third Edition
Publisher: SAS Publishing
Authors: Lora D. Delwiche, Susan J. Slaughter
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
good for both beginner and experienced programmers


I learned SAS using this book as the textbook. Later, I taught SAS using this very same book (at UC Berkeley Extension, Summer 1997). It is, in my opinion, the best introduction to data management using SAS. For those looking for other good teaching books, I also recommend (Ron?) Cody's.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Applied Microsoft .NET Framework Programming
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Authors: Jeffrey Richter
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Picks up where the others leave off


This book is an absolute necessity for anyone serious about writing programs targeting the .NET Framework. The author delves far deeper into the inner workings of this new platform then any I've encountered so far. It is not intended to be a tutorial, especially for a particular programming language. Instead, it's an in depth discussion on how the basic framework classes operate internally and how best to manipulate them efficiently and expertly. Virtually all the examples are in the C# language, but this does not prevent VB.NET and Managed C++ users from following the material. In fact, he does point out when the different languages utilize the framework differently and/or how these languages map into the framework. Chapters 2 & 3 did require my reading them more than once. The material is complicated and dense, but he covers it with great clarity and expertise. Just expect to return to it several times. He covers a lot of ground in great detail in these chapters on assemblies and the various strategies available for deploying programs and components. Also, the chapters on manipulating text and the garbage collection facilities are the best and the most detailed I've encountered. Many lights will go off in your mind as you're reading this book. I highly recommend this book to anyone AFTER learning the syntax of their chosen .NET language.