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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: IT Project Management : On Track from Start to Finish, Second Edition
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Osborne Media
Authors: Joseph Phillips
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Real-World


I wish I had this book years ago! My team has managed various IT projects, and this real-world book would have helped us design more realistic plans, stay within budget, meet our deadlines, and then assess what went right or wrong (instead of just trudging on to the next project).
I enjoyed the author's straight-forward approach to managing all elements of a project. I appreciated his analogies, his humor, and his "From the Field" interviews with IT project managers. The interviews were very informative. It's always interesting to hear how experts deal with some of the same challenges.
Great book. I'll be using it!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Network+ Study Guide, 4th Edition
Publisher: Sybex Inc
Authors: David Groth, Toby Skandier
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Groth's book gets it done.


I just passed the Network+ Exam N10-002 with an 873 of a possible 900 points. David Groth's 3rd Edition Study Guide has all you really need to pass. Pay particular attention to his "Exam Essentials" at the end of each chapter.....these are an excellent guide as to what you must know for the exam. Does this book cover everything? No, but there's more than enough here to help you pass, if you take the time to learn it.



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: High-Speed Digital Design: A Handbook of Black Magic
Publisher: Prentice Hall PTR
Authors: Howard Johnson
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
A great mixture of theory and practical examples.


Being a hardware designer for DSP and CPU boards, this is the most interesting book I have read the last 10 years. I read the entire book nodding my head and saying "This all makes sense". All the theory is there, but what makes it readable is the autor's comments on what really matters; such as: "The inductance of vias is more important than their capacitance to digital designers"



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML : A Practical Approach (Addison-Wesley Object Technology Series)
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Doug Rosenberg, Kendall Scott
Rating: 2/5
Customer opinion - 2 stars out of 5
Heresy! This is ICONIX, a compact method borrowing UML


This is the eighth software engineering title that uses the UML (Unified Modeling Language) that I have read in the last five months as I work to establish a software engineering guide and reference framework for a small team at my technology company. This book really sets forth the ICONIX methodology, the author's streamlined approach to modeling using mostly, but not only, UML.
Because of the author's quarrelsome nature and unusual departures from common progressions in the model views, I found this book less useful than the others. The author repeatedly explains (with a careful record of the dates) how much of his integration of the competing OO modeling methods preceded the work of the UML founders (Booch, Jacobson, and Rumbaugh) and frequently raises the small quarrels in the UML world for no purpose except to give a quick and unsupported opinion. Not surprisingly, ten of the twenty-five citations in the bibliography are the author's prior papers.
Although the title claims the method is "use case driven," techniques and guidelines for use cases are poorly done; and the author suggests that the requirements stage should begin with domain modeling and "robustness diagrams" before text for use cases is written. The author also places heavy emphasis on screen mockups during the requirements stage.
The contents would make a good lecture or two; but it is an annoying departure from the efforts of many to extend and enrich UML. Since the book is only 165 pages, it won't hurt for long, and there are thoughts here and there worth reading. Perhaps it's tongue-in-cheek, a test to see if we can spot obvious logical problems with the method.