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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Learning Perl, Third Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Randal L. Schwartz, Tom Phoenix
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
The most entertaining education a geek can get.


There's a LOT of bad computer books. There are many good ones. There are a few that are downright fun. If you're not sure you want to learn Perl, get this book. You'll have fun and by the time it's over, you'll have learned it anyway.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Learning Perl, Third Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Randal L. Schwartz, Tom Phoenix
Rating: 3/5
Customer opinion - 3 stars out of 5
Decent learning book


I have seen Perl before, but never could understand other people's code. I got this book to help me get a leg up on Perl. Generally I liked to book. I think the author went way overboard on footnotes. Footnotes should give more detailed info or where to look for more info. He used his for editorial comments. Also, I thought some of the topics got fired at you in odd places. For instance, the introduction of 'my' to define a local variable, got shoved in way late in a place not really relevant.
Generally, I found the book useful on understanding Perl and how it works. I will need the Perl book now for a reference.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Network+ Certification for Dummies (With CD-ROM)
Publisher: For Dummies
Authors: Ron Gilster
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Network+ Certification For Dummies


A cost effective certification book, all the rewards in half the time compared to more expensive and voluminous books. I scored 95%. The CDROM is better than the book. Majority of Network+ material on the market are really overkill. N+ certification is really a waterdown version of Microsoft Network Essentials and TCP/IP. I have no real professional network experinece. All I got is my A+ and two semester of Cisco Network Academy.



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: End-to-End QoS Network Design : Quality of Service in LANs, WANs, and VPNs
Publisher: Cisco Press
Authors: Tim Szigeti, Christina Hattingh
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Good Treatment of an Arcane Subject.


Welcome to Quality of Service (QoS). Life used to be so simple, you went to Ma Bell and ordered just what you wanted in switched or dedicated circuits and you got a (more or les) clear channel from Point A to Point B. But then we moved to packet switching where everything being sent is broken into small packets, given a destination address and thrown out into a big communications pipe with billions of other packets, each madly striving to get to its own destination.

This book starts with the early history of making some packets more equal than others (to borrow from George Orwell) so that time sensitive packets (like voice) have a priority over data for which a few tenths of a scond delay is not critical. It marches to the drumbeat that proper QoS structure in your network will provide satisfactory service to each user with the minimum outlay for bandwidth.

The book has enough background and basic information to be helpful to the user, and continues as far as you want to go into the details of individual pieces of equipment. Being as the book is from Cisco Press, obviously Cisco equipment is featured, but it is general enough to be of use with older legacy equipment and that of other manufacturers. It's the most complete book I've seen on the subject.