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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: ASP.NET in a Nutshell, Second Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: G. Andrew Duthie, Matthew MacDonald
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
An Indispensable ASP.NET Reference


This book is destined to be a classic. It is a complete ASP.NET reference. This book also provides invaluable tips and advice on how to get the most out of ASP.NET. The only minor shortcoming of this book is that all of the brief examples in Part II (the Intrinsic Class Reference) are written in VB.NET. I say that this shortcoming is minor because these examples can easily be converted to C#. To include such examples written in both VB.NET and C# would have increased the size of this book by another 30% and offered nothing meaningful to the reader.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Learning the vi Editor (6th Edition)
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Linda Lamb, Arnold Robbins
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
A Vi Lover's Dream


I first got "introduced" to vi in the late 1980s and I've never wavered in my support of this sometimes-maligned text editor. However, it wasn't until I read this book, that I realized how powerful an editor it was and how many fun things you can do with it!
Besides describing in much detail vi's various commands, there are also chapters on vi's companion, ex. ex has a large number of its own commands that can be used in conjunction with vi while working on text files.
There are also chapters on various vi clones (vim, nvm, elvis, and vile - certainly interesting names on their own) and their features. The last part of the book features reference information on vi (commands, online resources, and a troubleshooting section) and ex.
If you love vi and aren't ashamed to admit it like myself, this book is a great place to learn more.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Applied Microsoft .NET Framework Programming
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Authors: Jeffrey Richter
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Great book...


...for professional .Net programmers, wanting to move on to the next level. The "advanced .Net programmer"-level!
This book might very well earn the same status in the .Net-community as Bruce McKinneys "Hardcore Visual Basic"-books did in the Visual Basic-community. Not for beginners though...
/Per Hultqvist



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Programming the Perl DBI
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Alligator Descartes, Tim Bunce
Rating: 1/5
Customer opinion - 1 stars out of 5
Browse thru it, but don't but it. VERY, VERY basic


There's little in this title that cannot be found in the online Perl DBI and DBD documentation. If you've never done any DBI, you can just browse the perlDBI docs and then go to this book to clarify one or two concepts (like should I use DBI or ODBC?). After that, you'll never touch this book again. It is just too shallow. For a DBI book, it is horribly bad. There's a lot of DBM which does not belong in it, there's no discussions of extremely important classes like Persistance, the SQL introduction is useless, very basic & incomplete and does not belong here either -you'll still need a SQL book-, there's no discussions on implementing secure Perl scripts for both web & stand-alone applications, no discussion on how much or what to program on Perl or on the PL/SQL (or similar) language of the database Plus... there's hardly any discussion of the real DBD modules (Oracle, Informix, etc) as they apply to production. Information that should be bold and highlited (like Perl's DBD::Oracle does not support Oracle's 8 new structures or new OO datatypes). And there's hardly any real example of production code, only snippets of basic sample code. To tell you the truth, "Advanced Perl Programming" -which is not a great book either- has most of the DBI material covered here & with better explanations.