Sponsored links


Valid XHTML 1.0!
Valid CSS!



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Martin Fowler, Kent Beck, John Brant, William Opdyke, Don Roberts
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Too bad we actually seem to need this book...


At first glance I wanted to give this book only three stars, since I still think that if "we" (designers, programers, etc.) would never need the stuff that is in this book as heavily (or at all) if we all would be doing our jobs as we should.
Now that I have read almost all of it, the book is really more on par with the 'Gang of Four' design patterns book, but then not from a design point of view, but from the point of view of practical day to day programming, where almost always code you need to change is spagetti.
Even the best designed software degenerates into spagetti very fast because of lack of documentation, lack of interest in other programmers that made changes to read documentation and just hack into the source code whatever is needed at that time, etc.
In such a screwed up situation - which we should never get into, but in practice almost always are... - the information in this book can really help you. It might even merit 5 stars, but I refuse the give it that because I still think the book says "it's okay to screw up and not really do your job properly in the first place; you can always do a bit of refactoring if it gets too much out of hand" and I do not like that frame of mind at all.
One of my pet peeves is that, because I work in a VisualBasic environment, the examples and indeed some of the refactorings themselves often lean somewhat heavily on Java and its features. That's no problem to me, but might be for "VB-only" programmers. But with a little more time (with .NET) this problem should vanish and this book should be even more useful to the VB community out there.
Despite that I do not agree with the books premise, I still recommend it to all programmers.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Inside LightWave 8
Publisher: New Riders Press
Authors: Dan Ablan
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Worth every penny!


This is by far the best written handbook on anything that I have ever read softwarewise.Most books that I have read were either too technical, too uninvolving, or uninspiring that I would get so frustrated and have to invest in even more books to fully comprehend the material. Inside Lightwave 8's format is pretty much the same with other books, but the difference is in Dan Alban's writing which is very engaging and there seems to be great care in making sure you understand the workings of Lightwave. He makes it sound so easy. With most books, I have to read the passages several times before I get it, but with this book I have had no problems understanding the material and find myself gobbling up the pages at a fast rate. I am glad I invested in this very thick, 946 page book! :-)



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Martin Fowler, Kent Beck, John Brant, William Opdyke, Don Roberts
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
If you Write Code for a Living - READ THIS BOOK!


I can't help but add to the amazing number of five-star-reviews - this book definitely belongs in every software developer's library. Much of this enthusiasm is certainly due to the excellent readability - Martin Fowler really knows how to write.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Inside Com (Microsoft Programming Series)
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Authors: Dale Rogerson
Rating: 1/5
Customer opinion - 1 stars out of 5
the MUMBO JUMBO approach ...


The author is obviously confused with the genre of technical writing. There are so many detailed descriptions of irrelevant personal experiences, stories, etc. that they're very annoying when you try to find the INFORMATION. Mr. Rogerson should have tried writing novels instead.