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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Dynamic HTML: The Definitive Reference (2nd Edition)
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Danny Goodman
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Well worth the time spent reading it.


I received this book as part of a class I took through Outsource Labs, and it was an excellent supplement to the course materials. I learned plenty about CCS Platforms and still reach for this one as I manage Web page content for my group at work. All of the tags, from <OBJECT> to <TFOOT> are described clearly and completely. If you're confused about event handlers, this book makes them clear with examples and lists of attributes. If you have Kennedy & Musciano's HTML: The Definitive Guide and this book by Goodman, your Web page management library is just about complete until you venture into Java. A worthwhile buy.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Inside Com (Microsoft Programming Series)
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Authors: Dale Rogerson
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Go For It


Frenkly, I just can't understand how someone found this book unsatisfying. Inside COM is a great book, which explains COM (and some DCOM and ActiveX) in the most in-depth and interesting way. The author is also a very good writer and managed to make a technical computer book a fun book to read that made me laugh over and over again. And again: great book!



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: 3D Game Engine Architecture : Engineering Real-Time Applications with Wild Magic (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Interactive 3d Technology)
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann
Authors: David H. Eberly
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Finally!


One of the criticisms I had of Dave Eberly's previous 3D Game Engine Design is that it didn't really say much about how to design an engine. Rather, it focused mostly on the programming/implementation details, which was disappointing to some. This new book is what many people expected from the older book.

In this book, the author walks through the design and architecture of a 3D game engine, using his Wild Magic engine as an example, but also drawing on his experience developing NDL's NetImmerse. Throughout, he describes why each design decision was made, and in many cases alternative solutions are discussed as well. This isn't just a high level discussion, however, as ample source code, figures, equations, and sample applications are included to get you started with implementation.

The topics covered include the core engine systems, scene graphs, renderers, cameras, LOD, animation, terrain, special effects, physics and collision detection. Numerous sample applications and tools are also included. Dave's writing style is clear and minimally conversational, and he's kept the math to a minimum, making this a remarkably easy read.

This isn't a complete treatment of a game engine, since some important topics (e.g. scripting, audio) aren't included, but the material it does cover is worth it. Whether you're currently working on a game engine, planning to start one, or just want to have a better understanding of how they work, you'll be happy with this book.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Java Swing, Second Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: James Elliott, Marc Loy, David Wood, Brian Cole
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Great Java Swing Resource


The Java Swing 2nd Edition O'Reilly book is a very good resource for learning and using Java Swing. The book covers the important and commonly used aspects of Swing without getting bogged down into the minute details you would find in the technical API specifications. The examples from the book are available on O'Reilly's website and can be downloaded from their site in one file or accessed individually. There are also brief errata available online for those last minute errors that didn't make it into the book.
The book is clear about what material is covered so there should be no surprises when the latest language constructs aren't discussed. This book is not written for learning the Java language, but if you have a decent grasp of how Java works this book will not be over your head in most places. The book is focused entirely on Swing and not AWT or the 2D API of the JFC. The writing is easy to follow and the examples are clear to understand. For those who are converting from AWT to Swing there is a chapter that explains the differences and shows how to convert a few objects into Swing components. The book is aimed at learning Swing without any previous knowledge of AWT. I highly recommend this book for any developer that wants a good resource and teaching aid for learning and developing in Swing.