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Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Thinking in Java (3rd Edition)
Publisher: Prentice Hall PTR
Authors: Bruce Eckel
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Still the Best


I love and have bought this book for all the reasons I loved (and bought) the first two editions, and I appreciate the expanded coverage and extra refinement of the new one.
I won't repeat at length what I said about the first two editions, but I will simply say that this book's title is very appropriate. It isn't just about how to do this or that in Java, but about a new philosophy of OOP as a form of communication. This way of thinking of things leads to methodologies--such as the Design Patterns movement--that are far more successful at dealing with complex and dynamic systems than the more simplistic and direct approaches taken by most previous languages and methodologies.
I won't say that Thinking In Java is quick and easy reading or that most readers will get everything the first time through. I've followed the three editions through, exercises and all, a total of five times now, and I was still learning new stuff the last time through. This is no fault of the book. Learning Java is like learning chess. The rules may be relatively simple, but the implications of those rules are very rich in interesting possibilities, and also potentially very complex. It is to the credit of this book that it provides an intellectual path to this infinite universe of power and complexity for non-genius workaday programmers such as myself.
Some other posters have complained that it takes too long to learn how to do some particular concrete task, or there isn't enough sample code to cut and paste into their projects, or that there aren't enough pretty pictures to guide them through how to do stuff. Thinking In Java is not a cookbook. It will do nothing to help the drag-and-drop scripting crowd that approaches the craft of programming as an exercise in cobbling together ready-made bits of code without bothering to understand how anything they are using actually works. It is doubtful that such people will ever understand and appreciate this book or the Java language itself, for that matter. I would suggest they they stick with Visual Basic until they have the time to devote to learning Object Oriented Programming, which VB is not.



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: Discrete-Time Signal Processing (2nd Edition)
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Authors: Alan V. Oppenheim, Ronald W. Schafer, John R. Buck
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Simply the best


I'm almost an engineer and during my digital signal theory course I found this book exaustive, precise, never approximative. If you want to start learning about DSP theory, read this one even if you'll need some knowledge especially in the field of complex analysys; anyway when you get to the end you'll be able to make filter projects in the same way you drink a glass of water!! The content of the book is well exposed: the author start introducing LTI systems representation, then he explores the Z-transform domain; after that he goes on speaking about A/D and D/A conversion. As far as I'm concerned I found chap 6 (about structures for digital filter) and chap 7 (about filter techniques) extremely interesting and useful. Hey, guys, if you don't have understood yet, this is a MUST



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: Error Control Coding, Second Edition
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Authors: Shu Lin, Daniel J. Costello
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
very useful for both beginners and experts


I bought this book after reading the first few chapters of Shu Lin's "An Introduction to Error Correcting Codes" pub in 1970. Since that was very understandable (but unavailable), I opted for this one. Alas, I got bogged down in the additional math almost immediately. This is a bit heavy duty stuff for learning on your own. Maybe I can find a class some day and get through the wall of fire.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Hardening Cisco Routers (O'Reilly Networking)
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Thomas Akin
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
A TRUE Goldmine for Cisco admins


This book is a huge *must* for anyone who works with Cisco routers. I got it because as a network admin I needed a checklist on securing our routers. Showed it to our InfoSec director and he ordered all our routers nationwide to be secured according to the book's checklists!